1444 S. 113th Street West Allis , WI 53214 Phone: 414-258-2800 Fax: 414-258-2855
1143 Warwick Way Racine, WI 53406 Phone: 262-321-0110 Fax: 262-321-0212

Patient Resource Center

  • Print | Email | + More
  • Font Size: Aa Aa Aa

Products & Services

Compression Therapy

There are many conditions for which compression therapy is recommended. Some of the most common diagnoses which can greatly benefit by applying graduated compression are:

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) mainly affects the large veins in the lower leg and thigh. The clot can block blood flow and cause swelling and pain. When a clot breaks off and moves through the bloodstream, this is called an embolism. An embolism can get stuck in the brain, lungs, heart, or other area, leading to severe damage. Blood clots may form when something slows or changes the flow of blood in the veins.

Edema

Edema means swelling caused by fluid in your body's tissues. It usually occurs in the feet, ankles and legs, but it can involve your entire body.

Lymphedema

Lymphedema is caused by a blockage in your lymphatic system, an important part of your immune and circulatory systems. The blockage prevents lymph fluid from draining well, and as the fluid builds up, the swelling continues. Causes of lymphedema include: infection, cancer and cancer treatments, scar tissue from radiation therapy or surgical removal of lymph nodes, and inherited conditions in which lymph nodes or vessels are absent or abnormal

Stasis Dermatitis

Stasis dermatitis is a skin condition due to the buildup of fluid (swelling) under the skin. The extra fluid that builds up in the body makes it hard for the blood to feed cells and get rid of waste products. The tissue becomes poorly nourished and fragile, resulting in stasis dermatitis. The disorder is common on the ankles because there is less supportive tissue in this area. Poor circulation in the veins (venous insufficiency) can cause stasis dermatitis and craters (ulcers) in the skin.

Varicose Veins

Varicose veins are enlarged veins that are swollen and raised above the surface of the skin. They can be dark purple or blue, and look twisted and bulging. Varicose veins are commonly found on the backs of the calves or on the inside of the leg. They develop when valves in the veins that allow blood to flow toward the heart stop working properly. As a result, blood pools in the veins and causes them to get larger.

Venous Insufficiency

Venous insufficiency is caused by problems in one or more deeper leg veins. Normally, valves in your veins keep your blood flowing back towards the heart so it does not collect in one place. But the valves in varicose veins are either damaged or missing and blood backs up and pools in the vein. This causes the veins to remain filled with blood, especially when you are standing. The condition may also be caused by a blockage in a vein from a clot (deep vein thrombosis). Chronic venous insufficiency is a long-term condition. It occurs because of partial vein blockage or blood leakage around the valves of the veins.

Venous Stasis Ulcer

Venous stasis ulcer is a shallow wound that develops when the leg veins don't return blood back toward the heart as they normally would (venous insufficiency). The blood may leak out of the vein and into the surrounding tissue. This can lead to a breakdown of the tissue and an ulcer. These ulcers usually develop on the sides of the lower leg, above the ankle and below the calf. Venous skin ulcers are slow to heal and often come back if you don't take steps to prevent them.